Here's the Reason People Get Swastika Tattoos That No One Is Talking About

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You Won't Believe Which Famous Model Used to Have a Swastika Tattoo

Although many people recognize the swastika as the symbol on the Nazi flag, it has a history that pre-dates Adolf Hitler by several thousand years. The swastika motif takes the form of a hooked cross and it first appeared during Neolithic Eurasia. The word swastika originates from the Sanskrit svastika, which translates to good fortune or well-being. It has been apparent in Hindi, Buddhist, and Jain cultures for centuries and to this day the symbol can still be found in art, literature, commercial goods, and religious buildings. Yet despite the swastika's rich and abundant history throughout countries that pre-date Christianity, it is still commonly regarded in the west in association with the Nazi party and the white supremacy movement.

Even in 2017, many white power groups continue to use the swastika an emblem of hatred and many even tattoo their bodies with the symbol in allegiance to Nazi principles. However, despite the sociological controversy that associates the swastika with the white power movement—there's a reason why people continue to ink this symbol on their body despite denouncing the alt-right. Find out why more people than ever are getting swastika tattoos and why we should be seriously concerned about it.

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