What Really Happens When You Donate Your Body to Science?

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Would You Rather Be Dissected by Medical Students or Rot on a Body Farm?

Over the last several decades, the medical world has been able to make huge steps forward with the help from an unexpected population: the dead. That's right, bodies donated to science make a huge difference in the education and research of medical professionals, often serving monumental benefits to the patients of today. And while many of you are familiar with the concept of donating your body to science, do you know what really happens when you sign your corpse away? Take a look at the gallery below to discover 6 common ways cadavers are used in the medical world and let us know in the comments section on Facebook if you will be donating your body to science after leaving this world?

LUKAVAC, BOSNIA HERZEGOVINA - JULY 13:  Forensic anthropologists Kerry-Ann Martin of Great Britain examines a cranium exhumed from a mass grave at the Lukavac Re-association Center of the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) July 13, 2005 in Lukavac, Bosnia-Herzegovina. ICMP is using DNA samples to help identify remains from mass graves in Srebrenca in the former Yugoslavia. Some 8,000 Muslims, mostly men and boys, were slaughtered at Srebrenca in July 1995 by Bosnian Serb soldiers who had overrun the town located in the eastern part of the country. Of those 8,000, only 2,000 have been identified. Nearly 26,000 individual missing person samples have been collected in the area. Scientists compare the DNA samples with samples taken from living family members. ICMP pioneered the use of DNA for identifying missing persons on a mass scale. ICMP scientists are also helping identify the remains of victims of the Asian tsunami that claimed more 150,000 lives earlier this year.  (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)

LUKAVAC, BOSNIA HERZEGOVINA - JULY 13: Forensic anthropologists Kerry-Ann Martin of Great Britain examines a cranium exhumed from a mass grave at the Lukavac Re-association Center of the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) July 13, 2005 in Lukavac, Bosnia-Herzegovina. ICMP is using DNA samples to help identify remains from mass graves in Srebrenca in the former Yugoslavia. Some 8,000 Muslims, mostly men and boys, were slaughtered at Srebrenca in July 1995 by Bosnian Serb soldiers who had overrun the town located in the eastern part of the country. Of those 8,000, only 2,000 have been identified. Nearly 26,000 individual missing person samples have been collected in the area. Scientists compare the DNA samples with samples taken from living family members. ICMP pioneered the use of DNA for identifying missing persons on a mass scale. ICMP scientists are also helping identify the remains of victims of the Asian tsunami that claimed more 150,000 lives earlier this year. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)