Mills deleted her Twitter account following backlash from her new tattoo

Elle Mills is a 20-year-old YouTube creator based in Ontario. She gained acclaim after winning the “Breakout YouTuber” category at the 2018 Short Awards and went on to be featured prominently in that year’s YouTube Rewind video. As a creator, her channel focuses on coming-of-age content for Generation Z and some of her most popular videos discuss emotional topics such as eating disorders, coming out, and mental illness. 

Photo via Elle Mills

Photo via Elle Mills

However, not every video Mills makes is serious and sometimes, she likes to have fun with her online fans. One of the ways Mills has shown her spontaneous side is by getting tattooed and some of her tattoos include the Instagram handle of friend Tavian Palacios on her left ankle, the words “Pink Ladies” on her right ankle, and the phrase “No Ragrets” on her left arm. And while Mills may be rocking her other tattoos with pride, after posting a photo of her latest tattoo, the backlash prompted her to delete her Twitter and Instagram pages.

On February 11th, Mills got a brand new tattoo on her right arm and shared progress pictures with her fans on Twitter. The tattoo follows the trend of her past pieces, as she opted to make a joke instead of something more meaningful or artistic. The Tweet gained almost 30K likes in a matter of minutes, however, not all comments were positive.

Many Twitter users were quick to pick apart Mill’s new tattoo and shortly after the backlash began pouring in, the YouTuber deleted her Twitter and Instagram accounts. Her fans were quick to come to her defense to put a stop to the online bullying. The damage, however, had already been done.

We’ll stay tuned to see if Mills emerges back on social media or if she posts a response to the backlash on her YouTube channel. If you’re asking for our verdict on the tattoo, we have no problem with the piece and believe that she’s entitled to get whatever she wants, as long as she’s not putting herself or others in harm's way. After all, it’s 2019 and tattoos hold a much different weight in our society than they did ten years ago. 

Photo via Twitter

Photo via Twitter